8 thoughts on “Things Not to Say to Moms of Special Needs Kids

  1. you know I didn’t even think that the grocery store could over stimulate my son. thanks. he loves to go places with me. great read and i am passing this article on so others in my little circle can read it too.

  2. While our 3 year old daughter does not have special needs, she was born with extra fatty tissue in her right cheek. It’s very noticeable that one side of her face is much larger than the other. I don’t mind when people ask questions but I appreciate when they start off with something like, “I noticed your daughter’s beautiful smile (or pretty eyes, or…..). May I ask about her cheek?” I am much more inclined to answer those folks’ questions as opposed to the people who point a finger and say, “What’s wrong with your kid?!”

    1. Tammi, I agree! It is much easier to answer questions when they are preceded by a nice comment. It helps us to know that our kiddos are seen as more than just someone who has a difference or problem.

  3. How about oh he’s fine. I get that one a lot. People assume I’m just over protective when I won’t let my son go out without me. Yes he looks and acts normal, but there are social and behavioral problems You can’t see.

    1. That’s a very good point! Thank you for mentioning it! It’s important to respect a parent’s choices for a child because, without being very close to the family, we can’t always know why there are certain rules or boundaries.

  4. Very thoughtful article. I know that I am more apt to encourage a mom to ‘keep up the good work’ when I see a mom struggling with a challenging situation in public (special needs or not). I am a mom of 3 adult kids whom I home schooled – my oldest 2 have high-functioning autism. My 22 yr old daughter is very ‘young-at-heart’ collecting Build – a – bears & Tinker bell movies. 😉 They are great help around our home and helping with 80+ yr old grandparents.

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